Special Message

As we are undergoing tremendous transitions at every level in the Nation, with a new Administration, a new Congress, new state executives and state legislatures, new semesters underway at our colleges and universities, and a new normal, NAFEO is undergoing transitions to better equip the association to serve the NAFEO Nation and our partners. We moved our offices to 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Suite 400E, Washington, D.C.  20024. Our phone line is (202) 487-9125, until our carrier installs their lines at our new location. At that time, we will revert back to our longtime base number of (202) 552 3300. Our Email addresses are presidentsoffice@nafeo.org; cpage@nafeo.org; lbaskerville@nafeo.org; jadams@nafeo.org.

We are excited about our work together in this Season of New Hope.

C.A. Page, Ph.D.
Special Assistant to the President

Coming Soon…

Our enhancements include the development of a new, more dynamic website, which is now under construction.

Black History Month Message

By Lezli Baskerville, Esquire, President & CEO, National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education &
Douglass College, Rutgers University Distinguished Alumna

RE: Student Movement Messages Suggested by Rutgers University Hiring Dr. Jonathan Holloway, First Black RU President

Paul Robeson, the first African American football player at Rutgers University, a renowned scholar, actor, orator, bass baritone concert artist, stage and film actor, and global activist, who graduated from RU 101 years ago, is walking around heaven today singing, “It [took] a Long Pull to Get There” with a smile on his face as Rutgers University named its first Black President. More.

News Updates

NAFEO BULLETIN

NAFEO President Baskerville Urges President Biden to Include Aspirational Goal for ALL Federal Departments and Agences to Invest More In HBCUs Until Investments in HBCUs are on Par with the HWCU Counterparts

1/25/21

Every American President since Jimmy Carter has issued an Executive Order on HBCUs in recognition of the Nation’s failure to invest a fare share of federal dollars in HBCUs: in contracts, grants, internships, sponsored programs, and cooperative agreements. To remedy the underfunding, most Executive Orders on HBCUs have required the federal departments, agencies, and offices to develop and implement strategic plans to increase investments in HBCUs. Only one President to date, President Ronals Reagan, included as aspirational numeric goal.

With President Biden’s recognition of the value of HBCUs, their discriminatory treatment at the hands of government, resulting in their under-funding, and acknowledging also the central role HBCUs are playing and must continue to play in developing human potential, and closing the education, employment, entrepreneurial, economic, wealth, health, sustainability and justice gaps in America, that the Biden Administration: (1) require every federal department and agency to establish strategic plans with quantifiable objectives for increasing investments in HBCUs, and to measure and report annual progress under the plans to the President, Vice President, Congress, HBCU chief executives, and the executives of the national HBCU advocacy associations; and (2) establish an annual 5% aspirational goal for increasing federal contracting, grant-making, sponsored programs, research awards, and other investments in HBCUs until such time as they have attained parity with the average federal investments in other American colleges and universities relative to their missions and their outcomes.

NAFEO believes that the goal for increasing federal investments in HBCUs is especially needed at this time because IPEDS data from recent years indicate federal agency and departmental investments in HBCU have declined from $2,438,557,058 in 2010 to $1,963,328,814, according to an October 2016 report of the Chairman of the President’s Board of Advisers on HBCUs. In the absence of aspirational goals for increasing investments in people and institutions that have been denied equitable investments, the investments generally fail to occur.

Greater investments in HBCUs should occur because their returns are proportionately higher relative to Black and other diverse, under-represented populations—the growing populations of the Nation-than investments in other institutions While comprising only 3 percent of the nation’s four-year colleges and universities, HBCUs are leading the way in educating African American graduates in scientific, technological, physical, mental, and spiritual health professions. They are graduating 53% of Blacks in Agriculture, 50% of Blacks in Communications technology, 50% in education, and 46% of Black women in STEM. They are graduating disproportionate percentages of African Americans and Blacks in other fields required for a strong and competitive economy, a peaceful and just economy. The fifteen HBCU 2-year colleges are preparing diverse students for growth and high need disciplines in the workforce. They are preparing disproportionate percentages of Blacks for certificates and licenses in STEM and health professions, and will play a central role in putting American back to work, if invested in commensurate with their graduation of woefully underrepresented populations and growing populations. They are located in many of the most distressed communities in the nation, with the highest unemployment. They serve as resources and beacons of hope for these communities. The 2-year HBCUs are also assisting those who are in the workforce as well as returning war veterans to retool and leverage their experiences and service to make America strong, peaceful, and just.

Hampton University President Dr. William Harvey to Retire

Dr. William R. Harvey has announced his retirement after 43 years at the helm of Hampton University, effective June 30, 2022.

 

Photo Montage of NAFEO President & CEO, Dr. Lezli Baskerville, & HBCU Students at NextGen HBCU Voter
Empowerment Summit

 

Enhancing Leadership, Building Fraternity

The 2017 NAFEO Presidential Peer Seminar and Leadership Development Institute promises to convene a diverse and divergent group of leaders that will emerge as one potent voice for issues of great concern to HBCUs.
July 31-August 3, Florida

Looking Back

From the NAFEO 40th Conference, this historical short produced by American Technologies shares the history of NAFEO and the important role that HBCUs play in America’s success.

In The News

President Baskerville and Dr. William Spriggs, one of America’s foremost economists, talk with Mr. Roland Martin, journalist, author, media maven, and host of the syndicated television talk show, “Washington Watch,” about NAFEO’s Advocacy Initiative, “Emancipation Education.”

Social Justice Universities

HBCUs are critical for producing a diverse pipeline of quality employees, entrepreneurs, change agents, and social justice advocates the world needs; people with the content and character that are required to move the world toward becoming a sustainable community of One.

Hampton University President Dr. William Harvey to Retire

Dr. William R. Harvey has announced his retirement after 43 years at the helm of Hampton University, effective June 30, 2022.

 

Photo Montage of NAFEO President & CEO, Dr. Lezli Baskerville, & HBCU Students at NextGen HBCU Voter
Empowerment Summit

 

Enhancing Leadership, Building Fraternity

The 2017 NAFEO Presidential Peer Seminar and Leadership Development Institute promises to convene a diverse and divergent group of leaders that will emerge as one potent voice for issues of great concern to HBCUs.
July 31-August 3, Florida

Looking Back

From the NAFEO 40th Conference, this historical short produced by American Technologies shares the history of NAFEO and the important role that HBCUs play in America’s success.

In The News

President Baskerville and Dr. William Spriggs, one of America’s foremost economists, talk with Mr. Roland Martin, journalist, author, media maven, and host of the syndicated television talk show, “Washington Watch,” about NAFEO’s Advocacy Initiative, “Emancipation Education.”

Social Justice Universities

HBCUs are critical for producing a diverse pipeline of quality employees, entrepreneurs, change agents, and social justice advocates the world needs; people with the content and character that are required to move the world toward becoming a sustainable community of One.

NAFEO Nation Salutes the 61 Students From 59 Colleges & Universities Named 2017 HBCU All-Stars


ALABAMA  

  • Montgomery – Arianne Price, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL
  • Northport – Jamie Williams, Grambling State University, Grambling, AL

BAHAMAS

  • Bahama – Elijah Stevens, Bethune-Cookman University, Daytona Beach, FL

DELAWARE

  • Dover – Keonia Rodgers, North Carolina Agriculture and Technical University, Greensboro, NC
  • New Castle – Charlein Downs, Delaware State University, Dover, DE

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

  • District of Columbia – Dontae Bell, Howard University, Washington, DC

FLORIDA

  • Miami – Tasja Estiverne, Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, NC
  • Miami Gardens – Ato Watson, Florida Memorial University, Miami, FL
  • West Melbourne – Alexandria Washington, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee, FL

GEORGIA

  • Atlanta – Alton Butts, Morris College, Sumter, SC
  • Atlanta – Erin Baugh, Albany State University, Albany, GA
  • East Point – LaShawn Baynard, Savannah State University, Savannah, GA
  • Ellenwood – Ryan Rolax, Miles College, Fairfield, AL
  • Macon – Randall Barnes, Fort Valley State University, Fort Valley, GA
  • Stone Mountain – Brandon Long, North Carolina Agriculture and Technical University, Greensboro, NC
  • Stone Mountain – Fransheria Bazemore, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA

ILLINOIS

  • East Saint Louis – Karmeen Powell-Childress, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS
  • Chicago – Lea Hemphill, Southern University Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, LA
  • Chicago – Tiaara Anderson, Philander Smith College, Little Rock, AR
INDIANA

  • Gary – David King Jr., Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL

JAMAICA

  • Portland – Nikolai Knight, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff, AR

KANSAS

  • Hutchinson – Ta’Mara Hill, Wiley College, Marshall, TX

LOUISIANA

  • New Orleans – Yo’Sha Lain, Southern University Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, LA
  • Winnsboro – Nicholas Alexander, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN

MARYLAND

  • Baltimore – Aaron Mackell, Hampton University, Hampton, VA
  • Baltimore – Lakeisha Mixon, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD
  • Baltimore – JaJuan Sanders, Oakwood University, Huntsville, AL
  • Capital Heights – Dajanay White, Edward Waters College, Jacksonville, FL
  • Silver Spring – Mamei Willie-Bonglo, University of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC
  • Silver Spring – Rachel Rosario, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN
  • Upper Marlboro – Shanell Powell, Bowie State University, Bowie, MD

MICHIGAN

  • Detroit – Rogi Banks, Howard University, Washington, DC

MISSISSIPPI

  • Holy Springs – Ba’Sheerah Williams, Rust College, Holy Spring, MS
  • Jackson – Jeffrey Fairley, Hinds Community College, Utica, MS

MISSOURI

  • Lees Summit – Khiala Tyson, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN
  • Kansas City – Derrick Parker, Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA
  • St. Louis – Aaron Batiste, Harris-Stowe State University, St. Louis, MO
  • St. Louis – Brionna Adams, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO

NEW JERSEY

  • Trenton – Deonna Williams, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA

NEW YORK

  • Mount Vernon – Kailiah Evans, Lincoln University of Pennsylvania, Lincoln University, PA
NIGERIA

  • Lagos – Chidera Ntiwunka-Ifeanyi, Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA
  • Nigeria – Zoe Johnson, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD

NORTH CAROLINA

  • Charlotte – Terell Richardson, Livingston College, Salisbury, NC
  • Charlotte – William Gibson, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC
  • Greensboro – Shani McMichael, Bennett College, Greensboro, NC
  • Winston-Salem – Imani Cooper, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee, FL

OKLAHOMA

  • Drumright – Coleton Dudley, Langston University, Langston, OK

OREGON

  • Portland – Taylor Hall-Debnam, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA

SOUTH CAROLINA

  • Lamar – Terrianna McCullough, Voorhees College, Demark, SC
  • Orangeburg – Hillary Mokaya, Claflin University, Orangeburg, SC
  • Orangeburg – Omari Richards, South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, SC

TENNESSEE

  • Jackson – Jacarri Relf, Lane College Jackson, TN
  • Memphis – Bryan Redmond, Xavier University, New Orleans, LA

TEXAS

  • Houston – Adrianna Jackson, Dillard University, New Orleans, LA
  • Houston – Samuel Kanu, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX
  • Port Arthur – Geremiah Lofton, Huston-Tillotson University, Austin, TX
  • Sachse – Monica Dorsey, Texas College, Tyler, TX
  • San Antonio – Passion Williams-Toomer, St. Phillip’s College, San Antonio, TX
  • Spring – Ervin Bryant, Prairie View Agricultural and Mechanical University, Prairie View, TX

VIRGINIA

  • Woodbridge- Denzel Goodlin, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC

WEST VIRGINIA

  • Bluefield- Brianna Vineyard, Bluefield State College, Bluefield, WV